Your pets are bound to be just as excited about the holidays as us. The house transforms with so many new things to investigate including decorations and sweet-smelling foods. All of these new stimulants mean they’ll be looking to explore, play, and maybe nibble at all the new things they find. It’s up to you to keep them out of trouble! Our animal hospital's holiday pet safety tips touch on some of the dangerous elements of the holidays so you can steer your pet clear.

Beagle with a Christmas tree in the background: Holiday Pet Safety in Edmond

Food You Shouldn't Share

There will be a lot of temptations in your kitchen for both you and your pet! Yet, while you can indulge with little regrets, your pet’s digestive system can’t handle the same things as you. Make sure they don’t get their paws on the following foods:

  • Baked goods and candy are not only unhealthy due to their high sugar and fat content, but some can also contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that is highly toxic to pets.
  • Keep fatty foods including meat fats and rich dishes to yourself. Fat is harder for your pet to digest—their bodies are used to lean proteins. Avoid sharing buttery foods and fatty meats like ham and sausage with your pet. Also, just as you don’t eat the gristle, neither should they!
  • Onions and garlic, as well as shallots and leeks, are all common ingredients in many of our dishes, but these potent veggies are toxic to pets!

Pet-Friendly Decorating Tips

Your pet will likely want to check out everything you’re doing, and all the new things you’re putting up, too. Unfortunately, some of the traditional décor of the season can be harmful to pets! Take our advice and be careful with the following:

  • Electric lights and their cords may look like a fun new chew toy. However, they can cause serious burns or even electrocution if chewed through their protective coating.
  • Ornaments can look a lot like toys, and some of them even look like treats! Yet they can shatter and damage paws, break apart and be ingested, and some of them are so small they can be eaten whole, causing an abdominal obstruction.
  • Tinsel, beads, and ribbons are all the cat’s meow. Their dangly and shiny natures are all enticing to your kitty, but can easily break apart or tear. These smaller pieces run the risk of being ingested, which could cause a serious intestinal obstruction.
  • The Christmas tree can easily topple over if playful pets climb on it, or swat at some of the ornaments. Take an extra precaution and anchor it to the floor or secure it with fishing line to the ceiling.

Parasites Don't Take a Holiday

Parasites such as fleas, ticks and heartworms are unfortunately a year-long problem in Oklahoma. Ticks can be active in near-freezing weather, while fleas are experts at burrowing in warm places (like in or beneath your home). While mosquitos, which transmit heartworm, do not survive in freezing weather, their resurgence in the spring is always unpredictable. We recommend year-round parasite preventatives for your pet to keep them parasite-free!

Contact us today for more holiday pet safety tips!

Cat sitting in a Christmas tree with a toy: Holiday Pet Safety in Edmond